Seminary Contextual Education Handbook

                                           SEATTLE PACIFIC SEMINARY

 

CONTEXTUAL EDUCATION HANDBOOK

For Students Matriculating at SPS in Autumn 2020 and Thereafter

Adopted by the Graduate Curriculum Committee, May 19, 2010

Revised by the Dean of SOT & Associate Dean of Graduate Studies March 13, 2013, January 27, 2015, June 21, 2016, May 22, 2017 & December 13, 2022


 

CONTEXTUAL EDUCATION HANDBOOK

INTRODUCTION

 

In graduate theological education, “contextual education” (commonly known as “field education”) is supervised ministry, taken for academic credit, and carried out in a local congregation, clinical setting (hospital, prison, etc.), parachurch agency, or church-related non-profit organization. This Handbook sets forth the objectives and learning outcomes of the SPU Contextual Education Program and describes the process by which prospective ministry settings are selected, the process by which site supervisors are trained, and the means by which students’ site-specific ministry activities are assigned, supervised and assessed. For the sake of clarity, the term “Contextual Education Coordinator” is used throughout this Handbook.

 

CONTEXTUAL EDUCATION COURSES

The Seattle Pacific Seminary has two courses that MDiv and MA students can take to complete their contextual education requirements.[1] These courses, along with their approved catalogue course descriptions, are as follows:


THEO 6940 Contextual Education Internship (2 cr.): Supervised ministry, taken for academic credit, and carried out in a local congregation, clinical setting (hospital, prison, etc.), parachurch agency, or church-related non-profit organization. Minimum time commitment per quarter is 10 hours per week at the placement site for 10 weeks. All sites by which SPS students can satisfy their Contextual Education requirement must be approved by the Dean of SOT or the Associate Dean of Graduate Studies and must agree to abide by the SPS Contextual Education Handbook. May be repeated for credit up to 12 credits.

 

THEO 6941 Contextual Education Intensive Internship (6 cr.): Intensive on-site supervised ministry that provides students with an opportunity to reflect on the practice of ministry in light of prior learning in THEO 6940 and other courses. All 6 credits will be completed in one quarter or summer (30 hours per week for 10 weeks). May not be taken in conjunction with any more than 3 additional quarter credits of course work. Internships must be approved by the Dean of SOT, the Associate Dean of Graduate Studies, or the SPU faculty member assigned to teach this course during the quarter in which the internship takes place. All sites at which SPS students can satisfy their Contextual Education requirement must be approved by the Dean of SOT or the Associate Dean of Graduate Studies and must agree to abide by the SPS Contextual Education Handbook.

 

STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES RELEVANT TO CONTEXTUAL EDUCATION

The following chart shows the Student Learning Outcomes designated for THEO 6940 and THEO 6941. The contextual education coordinator is expected to teach to and assess for SLOs 4 and 5 in the classroom component of the course, and to aid each student and his or her site supervisor in developing a learning contract that is targeted to these outcomes, while being relevant to the identified needs of the site. (Note: SLO 4 has variants, for each of the degrees offered at SPS. The coordinator shall help each student to calibrate his or her learning contract to the “apostolate objectives” specified for the degree in which she or he is enrolled.)

 

MDiv Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs in italics; vision statements in bold)


As an academy, SPS seeks the mind of Christ through theological study and reflection.

  1. Students will interpret and respond to the texts and traditions of the Christian faith.
  2. Students will demonstrate critical reflection on the Christian faith and society for a deeper knowledge of God and God’s work in the world


As an abbey, SPS endeavors to be a formative community that is a workshop of the Holy Spirit.

  1. Students will learn spiritual practices and participate in forming communities of discipleship, guided by the Holy Spirit


As an apostolate, SPS aspires to participate in God’s reconciling mission in the world.

  1. Students will demonstrate attentiveness to the work of God in diverse contexts through participation in the ministry of reconciliation.
  2. Students will discern their vocation to God’s reconciling work by participating in communities of faith.


 

 

MA Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs in italics; vision statements in bold)


As an academy, SPS seeks the mind of Christ through theological study and reflection.

  1. Students will interpret and respond to the texts and traditions of the Christian faith.
  2. Students will demonstrate critical reflection on the Christian faith and society for a deeper knowledge of God and God’s work in the world


As an abbey, SPS endeavors to be a formative community that is a workshop of the Holy Spirit.

  1. Students will learn spiritual practices and participate in communities of discipleship, guided by the Holy Spirit


As an apostolate, SPS aspires to participate in God’s reconciling mission in the world.

  1. Students will demonstrate attentiveness to the work of God in diverse contexts through participation in the ministry of reconciliation.

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

MINISTRY AREAS FOR CONTEXTUAL EDUACTION STUDENTS

 

An approved contextual education site will normally provide students with opportunities for supervised learning and growth in several of the 6 ministry areas shown below. An MDiv student is required to take a total of 6 credits of THEO 6940 and/or THEO 6941- Equivalent to a total of about 300 hours on on-site work – and is expected to invest about 50 hours of work in each of the 6 areas. A student enrolled in one of our MA-THEO programs may be required to also complete 6 credits of THEO 6940 and/or THEO 6941—equivalent to a total of 300 hours of on-site work. These MA-THEO degrees are as follows: Christian Ministry, Reconciliation and Intercultural Studies, and Worship and the Arts. Every Student enrolled in THEO 6940 and/or THEO 6941 is expected to design a contract (described in detail below) that identities the ministry areas on which they are focusing and identify the specific activities in which they will be performing with respect to each area. The contract will also demonstrate how the students on-site and classroom work will enable them to meet the Student Learning Objectives designated for THEO 6940 and THEO 6941 as shown above.


 

 


CONTEXTUAL EDUCATION CONTRACT

The Contextual Education Contract (CEC) is a document that organizes the agreement between the supervisor, student, and Contextual Education Coordinator. The Contract explains the requirements, responsibilities, and expectations of each role as all parties work together to meet the Contextual Education objectives at a particular ministry site. Most importantly, the CEC outlines the student’s ministry learning goals and activities, which are developed in partnership with the supervisor, and serves as a reference for accountability and evaluation throughout the contextual education process. Each student will submit one contract for the full academic year,[2] and a completed CEC form must be signed by all involved parties and should be submitted to the Contextual Education Coordinator by the end of the second week of the first quarter in which Contextual Education is registered.

 

SITE SUPERVISORS

The Supervisor plays a crucial role in the development of the CEC and the overall process of mentoring a student in ministry.  All supervisors must meet the requirements for eligibility, complete the specific responsibilities as listed, and adhere to the general expectations.


Requirements of Site Supervisors: 

  1. Service in a related full-time ministry position for a minimum of three years.
  2. Active service in current position for at least one year.
  3. Formal theological training (e.g. seminary-level theological training or equivalent[3]).
  4. Commitment to spending at least one hour per week in one-on-one meetings with the student.
  5. Commitment to completing required assignments in a timely manner (including completion of the CEC with the student at the start of the internship and evaluation of the student’s work at the end of each quarter).


Supervisor Application: 

In addition to these requirements, supervisors must complete an application and participate in an orientation and training session. An approved application must be submitted to the Contextual Education Coordinator prior to Contextual Education registration.


Specific Responsibilities of the Site Supervisor: 

  1. Collaboratively develop the CEC with the student during the first two weeks of the first quarter in which Contextual Education is registered.
  2. Facilitate the constructive participation of the church (e.g. lay leadership) or institution in the ministry of the student.
  3. Oversee a weekly one-on-one meeting with the student for discussion, theological reflection, and prayer, with an emphasis on the learning goals, activities, and spiritual formation of the student.
  4. Submit a formal evaluation of the student’s work each quarter (or at the end of the experience for students enrolled in THEO 6941) to the Contextual Education Coordinator.

General Expectations of the Site Supervisor:

  1. Help students to integrate theological study with practical ministry.
  2. Provide guidance and support for the student’s professional growth and competence, spiritual and theological formation, and vocational discernment.
  3. Create a structure that is challenging and educational in an atmosphere that is open and honest about the opportunities and difficulties of ministry.
  4. Provide personal support and encouragement to the student as appropriate over the course of the Contextual Education assignment.

 

STUDENTS

The student is responsible for adhering to the objectives and guidelines as described in this Handbook. General questions and formal inquiries should be directed to the Contextual Education Coordinator.


Specific Responsibilities of the Student: 

  1. Craft learning goals and activities in partnership with the Supervisor that correlate with both the objectives in the Contextual Education Handbook and the particularity of the ministry site.
  2. Oversee the completion of the CEC form before it is submitted to the Contextual Education Coordinator.
  3. Fulfill the course requirements as set by the Contextual Education Coordinator, including quarterly responses to reflection questions (see Appendix B).
  4. Complete a year-end evaluation of the site and supervisor at the end of the Contextual Education process.

General Expectations of the Student:

  1. Honor the commitment of 10 hours per week of on-site involvement (or 30 hours/week for Contextual Education Internships).
  2. Adhere to the Community Standards and Policies of the University as stated in Appendix C.
  3. Students are expected to work during major church holidays that fall in the quarter in which they are registered for the internship. Other holiday work schedules are to be negotiated between the student and the site supervisor.


CONTEXTUAL EDUCATION AND CLINICAL PASTORAL EDUCATION

  1. An SPS MDiv student must satisfy all 6 of his or her required CE credits in a church or parachurch agency setting, unless special approval to satisfy these credits at a certified Clinical Pastoral Education site is given by the Dean and/or ADGS and the CE Coordinator.
  2. An SPS MDiv students may take up to 6 additional (i.e. elective) credits of Contextual Education at a certified Clinical Pastoral Education site.
  3. The cost of taking a CPE program, whether in fulfillment of the 6 required CE credits or as elective credits, will be borne by the student. Regular tuition for the academic credits awarded for successful completion of the CPE program must also be paid to SPU.
  4. A certified CPE Supervisor is not expected to reconfigure his or her program in accordance with the SPS Student Learning Outcomes stated on pp. 3-4 above. But he or she is expected to work with the student and the Contextual Education Coordinator in developing a Contextual Education Contract that delineates the ministry learning goals and activities characteristic of his or her program, and to complete the Summative Evaluation Form (printed below) when the student completes the program.


Note: Please see website for the 1) Contextual Education Contract Form, 2) Contextual Education

Supervisor Application, 3) Contextual Education Quarterly Student Evaluation Form, 4) Contextual Education Summative Student Evaluation Form, and 5) Contextual Education Supervisor and Site Evaluation Form.   

APPENDIX A: CONTEXTUAL EDUCATION REFLECTION QUESTIONS

Suggested Reflection Questions to be answered in connection with THEO 6940 Contextual Education Internship (i.e., yearlong, 10 hour/week CE placements)



The answers to the following four questions must be submitted in essay form to the Contextual Education Coordinator no later than the last day of each academic quarter in which you are enrolled in THEO 6940.

  1. Describe in as much detail as possible a significant interpersonal encounter you had this quarter with one or more people associated with the congregation, institution or agency you are serving. Who initiated the encounter, and why? How long did it last? What was said by whom? What was the emotional tone of the exchange? What issues of spiritual, moral and/or theological significance arose, and how did you address them? How did the conversation end? If you could go back and do the conversation over, what would you say or do differently, and why?
  2. Describe in as much detail as possible a significant event (e.g., a worship service, business meeting, Sunday School class, youth group meeting, social gathering, etc.) that took place this quarter in your congregation, institution, or agency you are serving. What was your role in planning and executing this event? Who did you work with? What theological themes were implicit or explicit in what transpired? How did your analysis of socio-cultural and organization context of your ministry setting shape the way you contributed to the planning and execution of the event? What administrative competencies (e.g., your knowledge of church polity, budgeting, finances or technology), and/or executive skills (e.g., in time management, decision-making or strategic planning) did you bring to bear on this event? What surprises occurred before, during or after the event? If you could go back and do it over, how would you "stage-manage" it differently, and why?
  3. Describe the concrete ways in which your work in the classroom was put to use in your ministry setting this quarter. Be as specific as possible—note the particular concepts (from lectures, readings, or class discussions) or materials (books, articles, etc.) that you engaged and the particular classes in which you encountered them.
  4. You are a practical theologian. The diligent study of Scripture, church history, theology and ethics, and the faithful practice of the means of grace (prayer, meditation, journaling, fasting, almsgiving, etc.) are not simply preparatory to your career in ministry. Rather, they are integral, indispensable and ongoing parts of faithful and effective ministry. What did your time devoted to

God this quarter teach you… 

  1. about God’s nature, or about God’s activity in your own life, in the life of those with whom you minister, or in the wider the world? [Answer this with specific reference to things you have learned in connection with the “academic” and “apostolic” components of the SPS program.]
  2. about your vocation as a minister of the gospel, about your responsibilities as a husband/wife, father/mother, friend, and citizen, and about handling the tensions and conflicts among these various roles? [Answer this with specific reference to things you have learned in connection with the “abbey” component of the SPS program.]


The following two questions (in addition to the four above) are to be answered at the conclusion of the academic year: 


  1. Describe the means by which you came to understand the socio-economic and organizational context of your ministry setting. What challenges did you face in this process?  What did you learn that will be useful in interpreting future ministry settings?
  2. Describe your current vocational self-understanding, integrating the theological/missional vision that frames your ministry with your assessment of your current pastoral, administrative, and relational strengths and weaknesses. Be sure to indicate concretely how this ministry placement helped to shape this vocational self-understanding.

 

Suggested Reflection Questions to be answered in connection with THEO 6941 Contextual Education Intensive Internship (i.e., full-time CE placements)

 

The answers to the following four questions must be submitted in essay form to the Contextual Education Coordinator no later than September 20 of the year in which you are enrolled in THEO 6941.

  1. Describe in as much detail as possible three significant interpersonal encounters you had with one or more people associated with the congregation, institution or agency you are serving. Who initiated the encounters, and why? How long did the encounters last? What was said by whom? What was the emotional tone of the exchanges? What issues of spiritual, moral and/or theological significance arose, and how did you address them? How did the

conversations end? If you could go back and do the conversations over, what would you say or do differently, and why? 

  1. Describe in as much detail as possible three different significant events (e.g., a worship service, business meeting, church school class, youth group meeting, social gathering, etc.) that took place in your congregation, institution, or agency you are serving. What was your role in planning and executing these events? Who did you work with? What theological themes were implicit or explicit in what transpired? How did your analysis of socio-cultural and organization context of your ministry setting shape the way you contributed to the planning and execution of the events? What administrative competencies (e.g., your knowledge of church polity, budgeting, finances or technology), and/or executive skills (e.g., in time management, decision-making or strategic planning) did you bring to bear on these events? What surprises occurred before, during or after the events? If you could go back and do it over, how would you "stage-manage" the events differently, and why?
  2. Describe the concrete ways in which your work in the classroom was put to use in your ministry. Be as specific as possible—note the particular concepts (from lectures, readings, or class discussions) or materials (books, articles, etc.) that you engaged and the particular classes in which you encountered them.
  3. You are a practical theologian. The diligent study of Scripture, church history, theology and ethics, and the faithful practice of the means of grace (prayer, meditation, journaling, fasting, almsgiving, etc.) are not simply preparatory to your career in ministry. Rather, they are integral, indispensable and ongoing parts of faithful and effective ministry. What did your time devoted to

God during the internship teach you… 

  1. about God’s nature, or about God’s activity in your own life, in the life of those with whom you minister, or in the wider the world? [Answer this with specific reference to things you have learned in connection with the “academic” and “apostolic” components of the SPS program.]
  2. about your vocation as a minister of the gospel, about your responsibilities as a husband/wife, father/mother, friend, and citizen, and about handling the tensions and conflicts among these various roles? [Answer this with specific reference to things you have learned in connection with the “abbey” component of the SPS program.]
  1. Describe the means by which you came to understand the socio-economic and organizational context of your ministry setting. What challenges did you face in this process?  What did you learn that will be useful in interpreting future ministry settings?
  2. Describe your current vocational self-understanding, integrating the theological/missional vision that frames your ministry with your assessment of your current pastoral, administrative, and relational strengths and weaknesses. Be sure to indicate concretely how this ministry placement helped to shape this vocational self-understanding.

 

APPENDIX B: SEATTLE PACIFIC UNIVERSITY COMMUNITY STANDARDS AND POLICIES


These Community Standards and Policies can also be found in the “Student Life” section of the Graduate Catalog.


Behavioral Expectations: Seattle Pacific University's standards for behavior are representative of the University's identity and are designed to provide a positive learning environment while promoting the intellectual, social, spiritual, and physical well-being of students. The context for Seattle Pacific community standards, explained below, reflects the University's commitment to its Christian philosophy of education in the tradition of its Wesleyan heritage. Any questions regarding these statements should be addressed to the chief judicial officer or the dean of student life in the Office of Student Life.

 

Context for Community Standards: As the University develops and implements its policies relative to lifestyle expectations, the standards are shaped and informed by four sources: legal authority (local, state, and federal law), Scripture, historic Christian tradition, and the mission of the University.

 

Legal Authority: Local, state, and federal laws address matters that directly influence University policy. Theft, possession or use of illegal substances, under-age use or possession of alcohol, any kind of harassment, physical abuse against persons or property (rape, assault, and vandalism), possession of firearms on campus, and violations of copyright laws are examples of the way laws interface with policy.

 

Scripture: Scripture addresses issues relating to matters of character and integrity that impact the community and the relationships of those who are a part of the community. We affirm that all persons are of sacred worth and affirm that God's grace is available to all. The University provides counseling services for those who need help in clarifying personal character issues, relational and behavioral; or those struggling with issues of morality and moral behavior.

 

Historic Christian Tradition and the University Mission: This area is the most difficult to define because our community is diverse in its concerns over certain issues. Nonetheless, our roots and values are deeply connected to the Free Methodist and other evangelical Christian churches. Evangelical churches are those that find their authority in God's word and stress the need for a personal, redemptive faith in Jesus Christ.

 

Conduct Code: Community expectations are the general standards that govern the personal conduct of all students and student organizations at SPU. Behaviors for which students or student organizations are subject to disciplinary action include, but are not limited to the following:

  • Actions that constitute violations of municipal, state, or federal law. The University reserves the right to follow its normal conduct process whenever a student is accused of a criminal act, regardless of the location of its occurrence and regardless of whether civil or criminal proceedings have been instituted against the student.
  • Actions that interfere with the educational process or the administration of the University, including those that obstruct or disrupt the use of University premises, buildings, rooms or passages, or which incite a disturbance.
  • Dishonesty such as cheating or plagiarism; knowingly furnishing false information; alteration or unauthorized use of University documents, records or property; or the misuse of student identification.
  • Participation in any actions that involve discrimination or harassment based on race, color, national origin, religion, disability, or gender.
  • Any form of coercive or unwelcome sexual behavior, including sexual assault, rape, acquaintance rape, indecent liberties, or related actions.
  • Activities that cause or threaten emotional, mental, or physical harm or suffering; that demean the dignity of any individual; or that interfere with one’s academic process. Examples of such actions are verbal threats or abuse, harassment, intimidation, threatened or actual physical assault, or consistent disregard for the rights and welfare of others.
  • Conduct or activities that are lewd, indecent, or obscene, whether demonstrative, visual, verbal, written, or electronic (see the Acceptable Use Policy Statement).
  • Failure to comply with the directions of authorized University officials in the performance of their duties, including the failure to comply with the terms of disciplinary sanction. This also includes the failure to identify oneself when requested to do so.
  • False reporting or warning of an impending fire, bombing, crime or emergency, or tampering with safety equipment.
  • Unauthorized possession of, or damage to, University property or services, or property belonging to others. Unauthorized presence in, or unauthorized use of or duplication of keys to, University premises or property.
  • Possession, use or display on University property of any firearms, weapons, fireworks, live ammunition, incendiary devices, or other items that are potentially hazardous to members of the campus community.
  • Activities that may cause damage or constitute a safety or health hazard or interfere with the academic process. Such activities include, but are not limited to, entering or exiting buildings through the windows; throwing, projecting, or dropping items that may cause injury or damage; and pranks that create safety and health hazards for others and/or cause damage to University or personal property.

 

Seattle Pacific University Nondiscrimination/Grievance Policy: It is the policy of Seattle Pacific University not to discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, age, or disability in its programs or activities, as required by applicable laws and regulations. As a religious educational institution affiliated with the Free Methodist Church of North America, Seattle Pacific University is permitted and reserves the right to prefer employees or prospective employees on the basis of religion. If you have any questions regarding this policy, please contact either of the following persons:


Associate Vice President for Academic Affairs/Dean of Student Life Campus Location: Room 209, Student Union Building 

Seattle Pacific University 3307 Third Avenue West, Suite 212 

Seattle, Washington 98119-1950

206-281-2481


Director of Human Resources 

Campus Location: 330 West Nickerson Street 

Seattle Pacific University 

3307 Third Avenue West, Suite 302

Seattle, Washington 98119-1957 

206-281-2809


If you believe you may have been discriminated against in violation of this policy, please immediately contact one of the individuals designated above. Copies of the grievance procedures may be obtained from the above designated individuals; the Office of Student Life; the Office of Human Resources; and copies of the grievance procedures are also found here.

This publication is certified as true and correct in content and policy as of the date of publication. The

University reserves the right, however, to make changes of any nature in programs, calendar, academic policy, or academic schedules whenever these are deemed necessary or desirable, including changes in course content, class rescheduling, and the canceling of scheduled classes or other academic activities.

 

Disciplinary Appeals: Students have the opportunity for a self-initiated appeal of a disciplinary action. Appeals may be addressed in writing to the appropriate University official within 48 hours of receipt by the student of the written notice of disciplinary action. The University attempts to provide ample information about community structures, expectations, and practices to all members, especially to those who are new each year. If you would like more information about behavioral standards or the disciplinary process, contact the chief judicial officer or the office of the dean of student life.

 

Sexual Harassment: Seattle Pacific University is committed to maintaining an academic and social environment free of sexual harassment and assault. Members of our community have the right to work, study, and communicate with each other in an atmosphere free from unsolicited and unwelcome communication of a sexual nature. Sexual harassment is a form of misconduct that violates the integrity and trust in human relationships. Sexual harassment does not refer to occasional appropriate compliments. Rather, it is behavior that is personally intrusive, offensive, debilitating to morale, and insulting to human worth and dignity. Sexual harassment of students is marked by inappropriate sexually oriented attention by anyone (faculty member, staff member, or student) who is in a position to determine a student's grade or to adversely affect the student's academic performance, job performance, professional future, participation in campus activities, use of campus services and facilities, or ability to function comfortably in the SPU community.


Students who believe they have been sexually harassed or who have concerns about the appropriateness of faculty, staff, or student behavior may seek support and counsel from among a variety of helpful campus resources and people trained in the prevention of sexual harassment. The consultation will remain confidential if the student wishes. Formal complaints of sexual harassment may be addressed to the dean of student life (206-281-2481), the director of human resources (206-281-2809) or the Office of Academic Affairs (on campus, 206-281-2125). Further information and SPU's complete statement concerning sexual harassment is available from the Office of Student Life (206-281-2481), Human Resources (206-281-2809), or Safety and Security (206-281-2922).

 

Drug-Free Workplace and Drug-Free Schools and Communities: SPU is subject to the requirements of the federal Drug-Free Workplace Act of 1988 and the Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act of 1989. The University strongly supports the 1988 and 1989 acts and consistently ensures compliance with them. SPU annually distributes information regarding the restrictions and consequences of violations of each act. Any student who has not received copies of the statements should contact the Office of Student Life in the Student Union Building (SUB), second floor, or Human Resources at 330 West Nickerson.


The purpose of SPU’s Alcohol, Tobacco, and Drug Use Policy is to support the educational mission of the University with standards of personal health, moral integrity, and social consciousness. The policy is also intended to provide guidelines for members of the University community who are sensitive to the varieties of Christian perspectives represented on campus, the Free Methodist Church, and the community at large.


If the abnormal behavior resulted from prescription drug use in compliance with a physician’s instructions, then the policy may be waived. If the behavior is a result of drug abuse or alcohol use, the student will be subject to further disciplinary action, up to and including dismissal and referral for prosecution. If the behavior results in a conviction of a violation of criminal drug or alcohol laws, the disciplinary actions will be dictated by the Drug-Free Workplace regulations.


If a student is required to complete a drug treatment and rehabilitation program as part of the disciplinary action resulting from a violation of this policy, official records of the diagnosis or treatment will be kept for three years in the student’s records. The file will be held in the strictest confidence and will be used only as evidence to governmental and granting agencies that the University did in fact take steps toward correcting the problem.


[1] A list of suggested contextual education resources will be available from the contextual education coordinator and/or posted on the Seattle Pacific Seminary website.

[2] The CEC can be amended if necessary; however, substantial changes in the contract must be submitted and approved by the Contextual Education Coordinator.

[3] Exceptions for special cases can be made with approval of the Contextual Education Coordinator.